Upcoming session trains advocates, allies, ambassadors for refugee resettlement ministry

Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs
Posted Aug 14, 2018

Registration is now open for “Love God, Love Neighbor,” a three-day training course for clergy and laity that is designed to equip Episcopalians to be advocates, allies, and ambassadors for refugees and the ministry of refugee resettlement.

Sponsored by Episcopal Migration Ministries, “Love God, Love Neighbor” will be held Thursday – Saturday, October 11-13 at Christ Church Cathedral, Louisville, Kentucky.

The training provides an in-depth exploration of the global displacement crisis, the United States refugee policy, how refugee resettlement works, faith-based advocacy for refugees, and organizing to welcome and support refugees in your home community. The gathering brings together people not only from across The Episcopal Church, but also from ecumenical and lay partners to learn from one another as we explore different local contexts as they relate to refugee resettlement. The result is an invaluable opportunity to build community and relationships that continue on after the training ends.

Information and registration are available hereRegistration is $150, and includes all training programming and materials, a light breakfast and hearty lunch each day, and a reception onThursday. Beverages and snacks will also be provided throughout the day. Registration does not include housing or transportation to the conference.

Registration deadline is Friday, August 31 at 5 pm Eastern. Please contact Allison Duvall, Episcopal Migration Ministries Manager for Church Relations and Engagement,aduvall@episcopalchurch.org with questions related to this training.

“Love God, Love Neighbor” is offered by Episcopal Migration Ministries with funding from the Constable Fund.

Episcopal Migration Ministries is the Episcopal Church’s foremost response to refugee crises. Working in partnership with offices and groups within the church as well as with governments and non-government organizations (NGOs), Episcopal Migration Ministries assures safe passage and provides vital services for thousands of refugee families upon their arrival in America: English language and cultural orientation classes; employment services; school enrollment; and initial assistance with housing and transportation. For each family, the goal is self-reliance and self-determination. After years of living in limbo, refugees now have the opportunity to begin again on a strong foundation that honors their stories and dignity, thanks to Episcopal Migration Ministries.

The Constable Grants were named for Mary Louise Constable, who was a visionary philanthropist.  In 1935, in the midst of economic catastrophe known as the Great Depression, Constable made a monetary gift to the Episcopal Church to establish the Constable Fund.  Her desire and intent to add periodically to the fund during her lifetime was realized and culminated with a very generous final gift at the time of her death in 1951. The language of Constable’s will states that the fund exists “in perpetuity … to apply the net income for the purposes of the Society, preferably for the work in religious education not provided for within the Society’s budget.


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